Fishing Factors™ tips and techniques by Lee Bailey Jr

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Binsky fishing in winter

January 20, 2020 by lbailey

Binsky fishing in winter is at it’s best when the bass stop biting jigs, crankbaits stop working, and you don’t get anything on a drop-shot, the Binsky blade bait still triggers strikes. And when the fish are on them, nothing else in your tackle box will be as effective. I fish The Binsky vibrating blade bait that can be cast and retrieved or vertically jigged. It is designed with a shape and action to maximize all the fish catching qualities available in a metal lure. I believe guys tend to overwork blades. For me, “Short hops catch more winter fish. I just lift until I feel it vibrate, then kill it and let it fall to the bottom.”
“Gold is my number-one color choice, but I also like silver and goby pattern Binsky’s, particularly on tidal waters.

Fish the Binsky in winter

“There are times when a Binsky will out fish anything else you might tie on.”

Well, I’m more partial to the jig, but even I’ll admit that there are times when a Binsky will out fish anything else you might tie on. And the wintertime is a great time to fish a blade bait. I seldom go out in cold weather without having a 1/2-ounce Binsky tied to one of my rods — usually a 6-foot, 6-inch medium heavy spinning or bait casting rod.

I will fish them in the same places I fish a jig, including docks, rocky banks, seawalls, and barge tie-ups. Some anglers jig the Binsky on straight braided line to maximize response time, but I believe that results in too many snagged fish. I prefer 10-pound Seaguar fluorocarbon to ensure that head shakes or modest jumps don’t dislodge the lure.

Where to use the Binsky fishing in winter:

  • Deep of shore structure
  • Ledges, bluffs, channel breaks, humps and points.
  • Bridge abutments
  • Submerged timber, stumps, brush piles, grass, rocks, gravel etc.
  • Schooling fish
    • Suspending over deeper water
    • Suspending out in open water
    • Chasing bait on the surface or anywhere in between
  • Boat docks
  • Anywhere where there are schools of bait

I really like to capitalize on that stunned shad situation. The bass and other game fish as well, know they can get a pretty easy meal without having to expend much energy. Something they relish in the colder months. They can just ease around and pick off struggling baitfish from the pack. If you’ve got lots of cold water where you fish, one of my favorite winter patterns involves fishing the warm spells that we get every year. You know the ones I’m talking about, when things warm up a little and we get some rain that’s a good deal warmer than the lake water.

This is the perfect time to take your blade bait and work the points and pockets back in the creeks of your favorite reservoir. You see, the water that came in with the rain is warmer than the lake water, and that will draw the baitfish in. When that happens, you know what’s next, the bass will follow.

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